Racist graffiti, Chicago teachers strike, pay-for-play for school vendors: What Education Lab is reading

Chicago News

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When racist graffiti stands for so much more

In The Washington Post, Wesley Lowery goes beyond the headlines of a controversy in a North Carolina school involving racial graffiti and its effect on communities — and football season there. “The spiraling indignation echoes a recurrent national debate about whether pervasive prejudice or knee-jerk charges of racism is the more urgent threat to society,” Lowery writes. “At times, the warring factions seemed to occupy different worlds despite living in the same small community.”

Chicago’s mayor wants striking teachers back in the classroom

This week, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot and schools chief Janice Jackson wrote a letter asking the Chicago Teachers Union to have their 25,000 educators resume instruction, even before they reached a deal. “The students and families of Chicago cannot afford to be out of school for any longer, which is why we are asking you to end the strike and encourage your members to return to work while bargaining continues,” they wrote, HuffPost reported. The union wrote back, “We can’t trust them to do right by students if we go back without a contract.”

Pay for play in school purchasing?

For just $18,000, companies can pay the School Superintendents Association (AASA) to call them a “School Solutions” partner, The 74 reports. There’s little evidence that many such companies, including those that promote safety from shooters, are effective — but that doesn’t stop AASA from putting them on a list of products and services that “help schools save money, raise money and improve student performance.” AASA told the publication that they carefully vet partners. Some call the arrangement unethical.

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